In the Media

We honor the remarkable life of Senior U.S. District Judge Norman A. Mordue, an esteemed figure in the Elmira and Syracuse University communities. From his stellar football career to his courageous service in Vietnam, he exemplified resilience, leadership, and dedication to justice. Judge Mordue’s legacy lives on through The Norman A. Mordue Memorial and Scholarship Fund, aiming to establish local scholarships and a lasting memorial.

Norman A. Mordue, a decorated Vietnam veteran, gridiron star, and revered federal judge, leaves behind a profound legacy. His unwavering dedication to justice and heroism in Vietnam earned him the Distinguished Service Cross and other prestigious awards.

To celebrate his extraordinary life achievements, The Norman A. Mordue Memorial and Scholarship Fund has been established. Contributions will support local scholarships and create a lasting memorial in honor of this exceptional man.

Witness the chilling story of serial killer Robert Garrow as it unfolds on the big screen at the Landmark Theater on March 15. Prosecutor Norman Mordue, now a senior U.S. District Judge, reflects on his horrifying encounters with Garrow during the trial. The independent film “Garrow” delves into the shocking events that paralyzed Upstate New York and sheds light on the terrifying legacy of this infamous killer.
Lawyers involved in a 1970s murder trial will discuss it at Syracuse University’s College of Law. Defense attorney Frank H. Armani and prosecutor Norman H. Mordue faced off in the trial of Robert Garrow Sr. Garrow was found guilty of murder, and the case sparked controversy when Garrow revealed the location of two other victims’ bodies to his attorneys, leading to public outcry and investigations. Join the discussion to learn more about this intriguing legal history.
A lawyer’s ethical dilemma: should he reveal where the bodies are buried? Frank H. Armani, a legal role model, defended accused murderer Robert Garrow in 1973. While representing Garrow, Armani learned of additional victims’ locations, torn between protecting their families and his attorney-client obligation. Judge Norman A. Mordue led the prosecution against Garrow, resulting in his murder conviction.

Anyone who knew him would have a hard time summing up the man, the mind, the force of life that was Judge Norman A. Mordue. He literally lived multiple lives in different times and places. Judge Mordue is the kind of person they make movies about. He had an uncommon ability to instantaneously assess people and a situation in a courtroom setting and know exactly how to do his job whether as a prosecutor or Judge. His intelligence, integrity, reasonableness, and humor were ideals I have tried to bring to my work on a daily basis.

He had "true grit," and he exhibited it in every aspect of his life from early childhood in Elmira to the athletic fields of his hometown,

Syracuse University, where he was a standout football player, to the battlefields of Vietnam where he was a fearless leader and nearly sacrificed his own life to save others, to the rehabilitation hospital back stateside where he had to learn to walk again and recover from his grievous wounds, to the many courtrooms where he battled as a prosecutor and obtained murder convictions on behalf of the People, and finally, to the benches of County Court, Supreme Court, District Court where he meted out justice to citizens all over the state.

It was the honor and blessing of my lifetime to work for the Judge – to know and love him and consider him part of my family. Judge Norman A. Mordue was one of the finest, most exceptional human beings I have ever known, and it's unimaginable he is no longer with us.

Karen Felter

served as Senior Law Clerk to U.S. Federal Court Judge Mordue

Anyone who knew him would have a hard time summing up the man, the mind, the force of life that was Judge Norman A. Mordue. He literally lived multiple lives in different times and places. Judge Mordue is the kind of person they make movies about. He had an uncommon ability to instantaneously assess people and a situation in a courtroom setting and know exactly how to do his job whether as a prosecutor or Judge. His intelligence, integrity, reasonableness, and humor were ideals I have tried to bring to my work on a daily basis.

He had "true grit," and he exhibited it in every aspect of his life from early childhood in Elmira to the athletic fields of his hometown,

Syracuse University, where he was a standout football player, to the battlefields of Vietnam where he was a fearless leader and nearly sacrificed his own life to save others, to the rehabilitation hospital back stateside where he had to learn to walk again and recover from his grievous wounds, to the many courtrooms where he battled as a prosecutor and obtained murder convictions on behalf of the People, and finally, to the benches of County Court, Supreme Court, District Court where he meted out justice to citizens all over the state.

It was the honor and blessing of my lifetime to work for the Judge – to know and love him and consider him part of my family. Judge Norman A. Mordue was one of the finest, most exceptional human beings I have ever known, and it's unimaginable he is no longer with us.

Karen Felter

served as Senior Law Clerk to U.S. Federal Court Judge Mordue

Our next guest speaker will be LTC. David Siry, recently retired, who is currently an Assistant Professor of Military History at the US Military Academy. David is the Director of the Center for Oral History at West Point. He graduated from USMA in V 1994 and chose Armor as his branch. He served in many assignments around the world to include Iraq, Kuwait, Bosnia, Haiti, Ft. Campbell and Ft. Knox, KY. Most recently, he served as an Operations Officer and Executive Officer with the 3d Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division and as a Team Chief on a Military Transition Team working with the Iraqi Army, Air Force and Police in Wait Province with the 1st Cavalry Division.